Magazines » 1001 Model Railroading Ideas - Summer 1971 » Page 45 Text View Magazine View

Page
of 100

Summer 1971 - Page 45


MODELI N G PMENTACTION THE AROUND AND "OPEN PIT" MI N ES EQUI TH E
M odel railroaders are constantly searching for ways to sq ueeze as much o pera ting a ction as possible from a min i m u m amount of space. The long freight " drags" t hat p ly the Great Plains are b eautiful to b ehold b ut simply n ot practical for most home layouts - t here j ust isn't e no ugh area a va i lable for most model railroads to even begin to du plicate that "wide o pen" look of most real railroading. As a result , many more-experienced modelers have t urned to the more com pact portions o f the real railroads a s a focal poin t for the miniature e mpires. The most commonly-modeled area is t he industrial tra ct of some fringe area of a city where t he build ings are small e nough to d u plicate o n a model railro a d and where there is the constant actio n o f a switch engine plying cars in and out of the i n d ustrial sidings. Other m o d elers concentrate on the "short line" raiIIoads that serve some major industry like a sawmill, smelter, oceanside dock , or mountain mine. One of the areas often over looked by modelers is the " 0 pen pit" mining o peration. These real railroad "action centers" are a lmost miniatures of the full-size railroad with co mplex trackage serving the various levels of the mine and constant traffic in o pen and filled hop per or ore cars . "Open pit " mines are common to many areas of the country where iro n ore, coal , gravel, or co pper ore are stripped away fro m near-ground level sites by huge c ranes to be loa d e d into the railroad's w aiting cars. Jim Shiff, of Hollywood , Califor nia , had the sa m e lack of space prob-

MINIATURE MINE OPE RATION
45

Added June 2, 2011 - Share
0 comments