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May 1996 - Page 15


H R N O L R Y I N G N - 5 C R L E -T R R C H

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1 1 - The point assembly on a prototype turnout does not follow that found on the model d u e to reasons of strength needed on the prototype. Also, note that the points are much closer to the stock rails in the real turnout because prototype wheels are much thinner than those commonly used on models.

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1 2 - In modeling, the rigid frog turnout is the most common. Here is an example of a prototype rigid frog. Note the two guard rails and all the bolts, spacers and support brackets.

number. This ind icates the amount of d ivergence caused by the angle of the two intersecting rails at the frog. The number simply measures the distance at which a unit measure becomes the separation distance. For example, a # 1 0 frog d iverts the ra il s I ' at 1 0 ' from the po int of the frog. A # 1 6 frog diverges l ' at 1 6 '. The frog number determines the turnout number. Most model railroads use #4 or #6 turnouts. However, the pro totype rarely uses a turnout th is sharp . They primarily use # l Os, # 1 2s and larger. For h igh- speed m a i n l i n e s (70 mph or more), turnouts must be #20s or larger. A #22 turnout is not uncommon ! In most scales, these big turnouts are i mpractica l . For example, in HO scale, a #20 turnout would requ ire 2 1 '/, " from the point to the frog ! B u t in N scale, these big turnouts can be used without dwarf i n g their s urro u n d in g s . A #20 turnout i n N s c a l e w o u l d o n l y require 1 1 '/4'.
MAY 1 996

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M ODEL RAILROAD ING T 1 5

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