Magazines » Model Railroading - January 1991 » Page 5

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January 1991 - Page 5


Publishers

S. S. Danielsen, Nick Siegel
General Manager

Pam Greenberg
Executive Editor

Randall B. Lee
Production Manager

EDITORIAL
e've all thought it. Chances are we've all said it. In our efforts to re create the world in m i niature that we have already created in our m i nds, we are con stantly striving to close the gap between those products that are available and what we need. Each month, we check the new products column, hopi ng that someone has finally come out with a . . . whatever. H mmm. Noth i ng yet. Better check to see if someone has written an arti cle on how to make a . . . whatever . . .from something that is cur rently avai lable.And, every so often, we strike gold in one of those arti cles because it has shown us how to make a . . , whatever. We review the information carefully. Yes, we cou ld do that. No, it wouldn't be that difficult. Well, we might as well make it ourselves.Obviously, no one will ever make it commercially. A fter all, we've been looking for one for years. So, we care fully comp i le all the components and tools we'll need to build our o w n . . . whatev er. We then spend numerous evenings, a couple of weekends, and then finally, after many hours of painstaking work, we finish our . . . whatever. With a great sense of accomplishment, we proudly display our handiwork . . .only to discover that XYZ Company has just released - what else? A . .. whatever! Are we frustrated? You bet! Do we feel like we've wasted a bunch of time? And how! But wait a m i nute; why do we feel like this? A fter all, aren't we in this hobby because we enjoy modeling? And is n't the reward of build i ng a model greater than the immediate gratification received from just buying one? Well, unfortunately, or perhaps fortu nately, there are no correct answers to these questions. The answers you come up with for yourself may lend some i nsight into what aspects of the hobby you enjoy most, but they can do no more. If you lean more toward the "frustrated" or "wasted a bunch of time" feelings, then chances are you are what I would generally categorize as a model railroader. I f, on the other hand, your satisfaction with your work is unfazed b y the newly released product, then I would consider you to be more of a railroad modeler. S o what does all this mean? Not a whole lot, I suppose. But it could make a signif icant di fference in how much e njoyment you are getting from the hobby. If you're spending a lot of your time doi ng things you wish you didn't have to, you could e nd up k illing your i nterest in the hobby. Now before I get a lot of mail on the pros and cons of model railroading vs. rail road modeling, let me explain that I don't believe either is a mutually ex clusive seg ment of the hobby. We all benefit from each other, regardless of our i ndividual lean ings. And all of us will cross that fine line many times. But sometimes we need to examine where we are coming from in the hobby. A nd what better time to do that than at the beginning of the new year . .. and decade, for that matter. (I happen to subscribe to the notion that the decade of the '90s begins with '9 1 , not '90. ) D o you scratchbuild o r kitbash a particular model because o f the challenge? .. . or because one isn't commercially available? Would you rather superdetail a p lasti c locomotive? . . . or buy a custom-painted brass model? Would you rather build your own micro-circuitry? .or install a pre-built unit? I could go on and on, but I hope you see from these questions that there are times when each of us is more i nterested i n one side than the other. A nd those leanings will affect the types of new products we wish the manufacturers would make. So, what product do you think the hobby really needs? For me, it would be a line of high-quality, Ameri can-prototype ' 30s and '40s vehi cles. Ready to run, of course. M" ,II, I'm , mod" " lI m,d", om, ' " m od"",

LaDonna T. Vaughan
Contributing Editors

Scott Anderson, Ron Bearden, Vern French, Patrick Lawson, Jim Mansfield, George Melvin, Rich Picariello, Larry Larry

E. Smith, W.

Terry Stuart

J.

Puckett,

Circulation Manager

S Tolve
Typography

W

What This Hobby Really Needs Is...

1-

TypeTronics, Inc.
Typesetter

Kristin Doughty

Model Railroading is published 12 times a year
by Rocky Mountain Publishing, Inc , 2929 Blake St., Denver, CO 80205, (303) 292-0124. Price per single copy is $2.95 in U. S. A. Subscriptions are $30.00 in the U.S.A. or $38.50 in Canada (or for eign) - payable in U S. funds. Unsolicited manuscripts or photographs should be accom panied by return postage and Rocky Mountain Publishing, Inc. assumes no responsibility for the loss or damage of such material. No part of this publication may be reprinted without written per mission from the publishers. Printed in U.S.A. The information contained in the various arti cles in this magazine is presented in good faith, but no warranty is given, no results guaranteed, nor is any freedom from any patent or copyright to be inferred. Since we have no control over the physical conditions surrounding the application of information in this magazine, Rocky Mountain Publishing, Inc. and the various authors and edi tors disclaim any liability for untoward results and/or for any physical injury incurred by using the information herein. Copyright Inc.

1991 by

Rocky Mountain Publishing,

For advertising information contact Pam Green berg at 800-736-0427 or 303-292-0124.

Advertising

Subscriptions and Book Orders

For subscriptions and/or book orders, please attention S. Tolve, 2929 Blake Street, Denver, Colorado 80205 or call 1-800-736-0427 outside

send inquiries to Rocky Mountain Publishing,

metro Denver area. In metro Denver call (303) 292-0124. Visa or Mastercard accepted.

M odel Railroading (ISSN 0199-1914) is pub
lished 12 times a year at $30.00 per year in U.S.A., $38.50 in Canada, by Rocky Mountain Publishing, Inc. at 2929 Blake Street, Denver, Colorado 80205. 2nd Class postage paid at Den C lass Permit #9591.

ver, Col orado . Cana d i an Second

Postmaster send address changes to Rocky Mountain Publishing, Inc., 2929 Blake Street, Denver, Colorado 80205.

W.7

Randy Lee Executive Editor

I
M o d e l Ra i l road i ng


.J anuary 1 9 9 1

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