Magazines » Model Railroading - November 2004 » Page 26 Text View Magazine View

Page
of 72

November 2004 - Page 26


Scenery on the
by David Butts

HURON RIVER CURVE/CORNER MODULES
Photos by the author

N Y C MI C H I G A N C E N T R A L D I V I S I O N

NYC E7 heads eastbound on the Michigan Central with passenger train next to the Huron River on the east corner module.

T

he New York Central was known as the Water Level Route. What comes to mind is the Hudson River, New Yorks most noted river on the New York Central. However, the NYC did traverse many other notable rivers such as the Huron River in Michigan. Since my modeling focus is the NYC operations on the Michigan Central in the late 50s through the 60s before the creation of the Penn Central railroad, I have chosen to represent the Huron River in Michigan for a set of curved/corner modules I built for my home layout and for train shows. The Huron River was very prominent on the Michigan Central of the NYC. My source of references on how to depict the river scenes came primarily from books, Michigan Central Trackside with Emery Gulash by Geoffrey H. Doughty and Trackside on New York Centrals Western Division 1949-1955 with Sandy Goodrick by Jerry A. Pinkepank. The topography of the modules is generally flat, and that is appropriate for the area on the Michigan Central that I am trying to model. My goal was not to have an exact duplicate of the locale but rather to capture its flavor. In addition to the Huron River, I tried to add interest to the modules by adding rock cuts, hills, trees and other greenery. I made extensive use of products from Woodland Scenics and Scenic Express. On one of the modules I have water on both sides of the double track, one side being the flowing Huron River and the other side

being a marsh. Water scenes that I have seen on many modules at train shows tend to feature the water on the inside of the module. Conversely, I wanted the water scenes, Huron River, to be situated to the outside of the module. This more closely matched the river scenes I had seen in the aforementioned NYC books. Woodland Scenics has a line of products that I used to create the water scene on the modules in the accompanying photographs Realistic Water, Water Effects and Liquid Pigment. All of these products are easy to use and are water-soluble. Realistic Water simulates water and is poured; it does not require mixing, dries clear and is flexible, odorless and self-leveling. Water Effects provides the texture for waves and ripples and is applied with a brush. The Liquid Pigment, raw umber, provides the coloration or tint for the water. Other items and tools that will be needed for the project are: Masking tape and clear rubber silicone sealer to dam the Realistic Water, A bowl or jar for mixing the pigment into the Realistic Water, E arth-colored latex paint, paintbrushes and wood paint stirrers. Typically, water should be the last scenery item to be tackled on a layout or module so that the white glues or matte medium used to adhere ground cover or track ballast does not bleed into the water and discolor it. The first step in the project is to shape

the shoreline of the river, paint the riverbed and shoreline, add rock riprap and handle the other terrain features. My shoreline is formed using 1/4" beaded foam board from Woodland Scenics that has been shaped with a knife and rasp. I used Woodland Scenics Foam Tack to glue the foam board in place. To fill in the gaps and smooth out the foam board terrain I used Woodland Scenics Foam Putty and Flex Paste. Once the shoreline had been defined, I painted the riverbed and shoreline with latex paint in the appro-

Products used to create Huron River Realistic Water, Rubber Silicone Sealer, Water Effects and Liquid Pigment (raw umber).

26 MODEL RAILROADING

NOVEMBER 2004

Added December 2, 2010 - Share
0 comments